Almost half of last year's ICOs are already dead

Leo Zhang

By Leo Zhang

The headline figure comes from Bitcoin.com, which published a survey suggesting 46 percent of last year's ICO projects are inactive or abandoned. Last month, research by EY found that over $400 million USD equivalent had been stolen from ICOs in the same time frame. The token frenzy has proven to be an interesting experiment in herd mentality; let's hope regulators find ways to incentivize long-term thinking over cash grabs.

News

46% of last year's ICOs have failed already
(Bitcoin.com, by Kai Sedgwick)

"Abandoned Twitter accounts, empty Telegram groups, websites no longer hosted, and communities no longer tended are par for the course. A digital graveyard, complete with metaphorical tumbleweed, characterizes the crop of 2017 that decided to take the money and run."

Secretive Chinese bitcoin mining company may have made as much money as Nvidia last year
(CNBC, by Evelyn Cheng)

"Based on conservative estimates of gross margin of 75 percent and operating margin of 65 percent, the analysts calculate that Bitmain made $3 billion to $4 billion in operating profit in 2017. Bernstein's U.S. semiconductor team estimates Nvidia's operation profit was $3 billion during the same period."

Coinbase announces SegWit support
(Coinbase Blog)

SEC Cyber Unit areas of focus

Commentary

Can Kardashians trade on tweets?
(Bloomberg, by Matt Levine)

"Reader Jianchi Chen emailed to ask a great question: 'Would it be insider trading for Kylie Jenner to buy short term out of money put options on Snap and tweet out that she's no longer using Snap?' Insider trading, as I am constantly saying around here, is not about fairness; it is about theft."

President of Eurasia Group on digital attention

Technical

Twitter exchange between Bitcoin developer Pieter Wuille and cryptographer Matthew Green on Bulletproof

Bitcoin Q&A: Why running a node is important

Cardano's Ouroboros: Proving Proof-of-Stake can work in the wild
(IBT, by Ian Allison)

"At the heart of Ouroboros is a way of ensuring randomness when it comes to electing slot leaders. There's a kind of lottery whereby any stakeholder can become a slot leader, but an important idea of PoS is that the more stake a stakeholder has, the more chances they have to be elected as a slot leader."

Tools & Tutorials

A list of Bitcoin developers curated by BitGo engineer Jamieson Lopp

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Image courtesy of Wikipedia.